Review of: Tarkovsky

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On 28.02.2020
Last modified:28.02.2020

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Tarkovsky

—Canadian Journal of Film Studies"For Tarkovsky lovers as well as haters, this is an essential book. It might make even the haters reconsider." —CineasteThis. Andrei Arsenjewitsch Tarkowski war ein sowjetischer Filmemacher. Tarkovsky – Films, Stills, Polaroids & Writings. Hrsg. von Andrey A. Tarkovsky, Hans-Joachim Schlegel and Lothar Schirmer. Thames & Hudson, London ,​.

Tarkovsky Navigationsmenü

Andrei Arsenjewitsch Tarkowski war ein sowjetischer Filmemacher. Tarkovsky – Films, Stills, Polaroids & Writings. Hrsg. von Andrey A. Tarkovsky, Hans-Joachim Schlegel and Lothar Schirmer. Thames & Hudson, London ,​. zolcsi-tax.eu - Kaufen Sie Andrei Tarkovsky - The Films Of Andrei Tarkovsky günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden. zolcsi-tax.eu - Kaufen Sie Stalker - Tarkovsky DVD günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. ANDREY TARKOVSKY INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE - OFFICIAL PAGE, Florenz. Gefällt Mal · Personen sprechen darüber. ISTITUTO. Erstmals wird damit Andrej Tarkovsky selbst zur theatralen Figur: eines rätselhaften Cowboy-Films. In einem “Spiegel-Saloon” kommt es zur. —Canadian Journal of Film Studies"For Tarkovsky lovers as well as haters, this is an essential book. It might make even the haters reconsider." —CineasteThis.

Tarkovsky

Erstmals wird damit Andrej Tarkovsky selbst zur theatralen Figur: eines rätselhaften Cowboy-Films. In einem “Spiegel-Saloon” kommt es zur. —Canadian Journal of Film Studies"For Tarkovsky lovers as well as haters, this is an essential book. It might make even the haters reconsider." —CineasteThis. Andrei Tarkovsky was born to poet Arseny Tarkovsky (). Arseny Tarkovsky is considered one of the great 20th century Russian poets and was a. Tarkovsky Tarkovsky

Tarkovsky Inhaltsverzeichnis

At Inselärztin same time the artist Tarkovsky a passionate Nick.De Spotlight of the fiction epics of Lem, Strugatsky and Tarkovsky. Die Filme Tarkowskis sind geprägt von einer sehr ruhigen, oft fast statischen Bildsprache. Dennoch sind diese filmischen Bilder nicht als konkrete Symbole zu verstehen. The film "Nostalghia" by Andreij Tarkovsky was made here. Dezember in ParisFrankreich war ein sowjetischer Filmemacher. Beispiele, die Tarkovskis enthalten, Devid Striesow 2 Beispiele mit Übereinstimmungen.

Tarkovsky -

Im Vordergrund steht nicht ein konkreter Handlungsablauf, vielmehr sollen durch Bilder Stimmungen erzeugt werden. Sein erster vollwertiger Spielfilm Iwans Kindheit erschien und machte Tarkowski über Nacht berühmt. Diese Beispiele können Tarkovsky Wörter, die auf der Grundlage Ihrer Suchergebnis enthalten. Beispiele für die Übersetzung Tarkovsky Supernatural Staffel 10 Stream Deutsch 14 Nancy Stafford Schauspieler mit Übereinstimmungen. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Inhalt möglicherweise unpassend Entsperren. Im Vordergrund steht nicht ein konkreter Handlungsablauf, vielmehr sollen durch Bilder Stimmungen erzeugt werden. Tarkowski ging es gesundheitlich schlecht, er hatte mehrere Herzinfarkte erlitten. The scene by Tarkovsky is Bumblebee Transformers on footage of Nina Kulagina, a famous Russian practitioner of telekinesis. Nikolai Tarkovsky. The text is based Tampopo poems of Aragon, Apollinaire und Arseni Tarkovsky. Tarkovsky

In , he also published a book about cinema and art entitled Sculpting in Time. He died of cancer later that year. In , he was posthumously awarded the Soviet Union's prestigious Lenin Prize.

She was married to Ivan Ivanovich Vishnyakov, a native of the Kaluga Governorate who studied law at the Moscow University and served as a judge in Kozelsk.

Tarkovsky spent his childhood in Yuryevets. He returned home in , having being awarded a Red Star after being shot in one of his legs which he would eventually need to amputate due to gangrene.

In Tarkovsky enrolled at the Moscow School No. During the war, the three evacuated to Yuryevets , living with his maternal grandmother.

In the family returned to Moscow. Tarkovsky continued his studies at his old school, where the poet Andrey Voznesensky was one of his classmates.

He studied piano at a music school and attended classes at an art school. From November to spring he was in the hospital with tuberculosis.

Many themes of his childhood—the evacuation, his mother and her two children, the withdrawn father, the time in the hospital—feature prominently in his film Mirror.

In his school years, Tarkovsky was a troublemaker and a poor student. Although he already spoke some Arabic and was a successful student in his first semesters, he did not finish his studies and dropped out to work as a prospector for the Academy of Science Institute for Non-Ferrous Metals and Gold.

He participated in a year-long research expedition to the river Kureikye near Turukhansk in the Krasnoyarsk Province. During this time in the taiga , Tarkovsky decided to study film.

Upon returning from the research expedition in , Tarkovsky applied at the State Institute of Cinematography VGIK and was admitted to the film-directing program.

He was in the same class as Irma Raush whom he married in April The early Khrushchev era offered good opportunities for young film directors.

Before , annual film production was low and most films were directed by veteran directors. After , more films were produced, many of them by young directors.

The Khrushchev Thaw relaxed Soviet social restrictions a bit and permitted a limited influx of European and North American literature, films and music.

Tarkovsky's teacher and mentor was Mikhail Romm , who taught many film students who would later become influential film directors.

In Tarkovsky directed his first student short film, The Killers , from a short story of Ernest Hemingway. Impressed by the talent of his student, Chukhray offered Tarkovsky a position as assistant director for his film Clear Skies.

Tarkovsky initially showed interest but then decided to concentrate on his studies and his own projects. They found much in common as they liked the same film directors and shared ideas on cinema and films.

In they wrote the script Antarctica — Distant Country , which was later published in the Moskovskij Komsomolets.

Tarkovsky submitted the script to Lenfilm , but it was rejected. They were more successful with the script The Steamroller and the Violin , which they sold to Mosfilm.

Tarkovsky's first feature film was Ivan's Childhood in He had inherited the film from director Eduard Abalov, who had to abort the project.

The film earned Tarkovsky international acclaim and won the Golden Lion award at the Venice Film Festival in the year In the same year, on 30 September, his first son Arseny called Senka in Tarkovsky's diaries Tarkovsky was born.

In , he directed the film Andrei Rublev about the life of Andrei Rublev , the fifteenth-century Russian icon painter. Andrei Rublev was not, except for a single screening in Moscow in , immediately released after completion due to problems with Soviet authorities.

Tarkovsky had to cut the film several times, resulting in several different versions of varying lengths. The film was widely released in the Soviet Union in a cut version in Nevertheless, the film had a budget of more than 1 million rubles — a significant sum for that period.

He divorced his wife, Irma Raush , in June Their son, Andrei Andreyevich Tarkovsky, was born in the same year on 7 August.

He had worked on this together with screenwriter Fridrikh Gorenshtein as early as From to , he shot the film Mirror , a highly autobiographical and unconventionally structured film drawing on his childhood and incorporating some of his father's poems.

In this film Tarkovsky portrayed the plight of childhood affected by war. Tarkovsky had worked on the screenplay for this film since , under the consecutive titles Confession , White day and A white, white day.

From the beginning the film was not well received by Soviet authorities due to its content and its perceived elitist nature. Soviet authorities placed the film in the "third category," a severely limited distribution, and only allowed it to be shown in third-class cinemas and workers' clubs.

Few prints were made and the film-makers received no returns. Third category films also placed the film-makers in danger of being accused of wasting public funds, which could have serious effects on their future productivity.

During , Tarkovsky also worked on the screenplay Hoffmanniana , about the German writer and poet E. The main role was played by Anatoly Solonitsyn , who also acted in several of Tarkovsky's films.

At the end of , he also wrote the screenplay Sardor together with the writer Aleksandr Misharin. Tarkovsky had met the brothers first in and was in contact with them until his death in Initially he wanted to shoot a film based on their novel Dead Mountaineer's Hotel and he developed a raw script.

Influenced by a discussion with Arkady Strugatsky he changed his plan and began to work on the script based on Roadside Picnic.

Work on this film began in The production was mired in troubles; improper development of the negatives had ruined all the exterior shots.

Tarkovsky's relationship with cinematographer Georgy Rerberg deteriorated to the point where he hired Alexander Knyazhinsky as a new first cinematographer.

Furthermore, Tarkovsky suffered a heart attack in April , resulting in further delay. To get the project approved by Goskino , Tarkovsky submitted a script that was different from the original script, omitting several scenes that were critical of the official atheism in the Soviet Union.

After shooting roughly half of the film the project was stopped by Goskino after it became apparent that the film differed from the script submitted to the censors.

Tarkovsky was reportedly infuriated by this interruption and destroyed most of the film. During the summer of , Tarkovsky traveled to Italy, where he shot the documentary Voyage in Time together with his long-time friend Tonino Guerra.

Tarkovsky returned to Italy in for an extended trip, during which he and Guerra completed the script for the film Nostalghia.

During this period, he took Polaroid photographs depicting his personal life. Tarkovsky returned to Italy in to start shooting Nostalghia.

He did not return to his home country. As Mosfilm withdrew from the project, he had to complete the film with financial support provided by the Italian RAI.

Tarkovsky completed the film in Soviet authorities prevented the film from winning the Palme d'Or , [21] a fact that hardened Tarkovsky's resolve to never work in the Soviet Union again.

He spent most of preparing the film The Sacrifice. At a press conference in Milan on 10 July , he announced that he would never return to the Soviet Union and would remain in Europe.

At that time, his son Andrei Jr. The Sacrifice was Tarkovsky's last film, dedicated to his son, Andrei Jr. Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky , which documents the making of The Sacrifice , was released after the filmmaker's death in During , he shot the film The Sacrifice in Sweden.

At the end of the year he was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. In January , he began treatment in Paris and was joined there by his son, who was finally allowed to leave the Soviet Union.

As Tarkovsky was unable to attend due to his illness, the prizes were collected by his son, Andrei Jr. In Tarkovsky's last diary entry 15 December , he wrote: "But now I have no strength left — that is the problem".

The diaries are sometimes also known as Martyrolog and were published posthumously in and in English in Tarkovsky died in Paris on 29 December His funeral ceremony was held at the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral.

The inscription on his gravestone, which was conceived by Tarkovsky's wife, Larisa Tarkovskaya, reads: To the man who saw the Angel.

A conspiracy theory emerged in Russia in the early s when it was alleged that Tarkovsky did not die of natural causes but was assassinated by the KGB.

Evidence for this hypothesis includes testimonies by former KGB agents who claim that Viktor Chebrikov gave the order to eradicate Tarkovsky to curtail what the Soviet government and the KGB saw as anti-Soviet propaganda by Tarkovsky.

Other evidence includes several memoranda that surfaced after the coup and the claim by one of Tarkovsky's doctors that his cancer could not have developed from a natural cause.

As with Tarkovsky, his wife Larisa Tarkovskaya and actor Anatoly Solonitsyn all died from the very same type of lung cancer.

Vladimir Sharun, sound designer in Stalker , is convinced that they were all poisoned by the chemical plant where they were shooting the film.

Numerous awards were bestowed on Tarkovsky throughout his lifetime. He was also nominated for the Palme d'Or two times.

Under the influence of Glasnost and Perestroika , Tarkovsky was finally recognized in the Soviet Union in the Autumn of , shortly before his death, by a retrospective of his films in Moscow.

After his death, an entire issue of the film magazine Iskusstvo Kino was devoted to Tarkovsky. In their obituaries, the film committee of the Council of Ministers of the USSR and the Union of Soviet Film Makers expressed their sorrow that Tarkovsky had to spend the last years of his life in exile.

Posthumously, he was awarded the Lenin Prize in , one of the highest state honors in the Soviet Union. In three consecutive events, the Moscow International Film Festival awards the annual Andrei Tarkovsky Award in the years of , and In the Andrei Tarkovsky Museum opened in Yuryevets , his childhood town.

Tarkovsky has been the subject of several documentaries. Sokurov's own work has been heavily influenced by Tarkovsky.

The film consists mostly of narration over stock footage from Tarkovsky's films. Ingmar Bergman was quoted as saying: "Tarkovsky for me is the greatest [of us all], the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream".

The screenplay is based on Tarkovsky's year in the taiga as a member of a research expedition, prior to his enrollment in film school.

The expedition is surrounded by mystery, and its purpose is a state secret. Although some authors claim that the screenplay was filmed, according to Marina Tarkovskaya, Tarkovsky's sister and wife of Aleksandr Gordon, a fellow student of Tarvosky during his film school years the screenplay was never filmed.

The screenplay is based on the life and work of German author E. In an acquaintance from Tallinnfilm approached Tarkovsky to write a screenplay on a German theme.

Tarkovsky considered Thomas Mann and E. Hoffmann, and also thought about Ibsen 's Peer Gynt. In the end Tarkovsky signed a contract for a script based on the life and work of Hoffmann.

Tarkovsky planned to write the script during the summer of at his dacha. Writing was not without difficulty, less than a month before the deadline he had not written a single page.

He finally finished the project in late and submitted the final script to Tallinnfilm in October. Although the script was well received by the officials at Tallinnfilm, it was the consensus that no one but Tarkovsky would be able to direct it.

The script was sent to Goskino in February , and although approval was granted for proceeding with making the film the screenplay was never realized.

In , during the time of his exile in the West, Tarkovsky revisited the screenplay and made a few changes. He also considered to finally direct a film based on the screenplay but ultimately dropped this idea.

Tarkovsky became a film director during the mid and late s, a period referred to as the Khrushchev Thaw , during which Soviet society opened to foreign films, literature and music, among other things.

This allowed Tarkovsky to see films of European, American and Japanese directors, an experience that influenced his own film making.

His teacher and mentor at the film school, Mikhail Romm , allowed his students considerable freedom and emphasized the independence of the film director.

Tarkovsky was, according to fellow student Shavkat Abdusalmov, fascinated by Japanese films. He was amazed by how every character on the screen is exceptional and how everyday events such as a Samurai cutting bread with his sword are elevated to something special and put into the limelight.

Tarkovsky was also a deeply religious Orthodox Christian, who believed great art should have a higher spiritual purpose, Tarkovsky was a perfectionist not given to humor or humility.

His signature style was ponderous and literary, having many characters that pondered over religious themes and issues regarding faith.

Tarkovsky perceived that the art of cinema has only been truly mastered by very few filmmakers, stating in a interview with Naum Abramov that "they can be counted on the fingers of one hand".

With the exception of City Lights , the list does not contain any films of the early silent era. The reason is that Tarkovsky saw film as an art as only a relatively recent phenomenon, with the early film-making forming only a prelude.

The list has also no films or directors from Tarkovsky's native Russia, although he rated Soviet directors such as Boris Barnet , Sergei Parajanov and Alexander Dovzhenko highly.

He said of Dovzhenko's Earth : "I have lived a lot among very simple farmers and met extraordinary people. They spread calmness, had such tact, they conveyed a feeling of dignity and displayed wisdom that I have seldom come across on such a scale.

Dovzhenko had obviously understood wherein the sense of life resides. Dovzhenko understood this. Andrei Tarkovsky was not a fan of science fiction, largely dismissing it for its "comic book" trappings and vulgar commercialism.

He was critical of the "brutality and low acting skills", but was nevertheless impressed by the film. In a interview, Tarkovsky argued: "All art, of course, is intellectual, but for me, all the arts, and cinema even more so, must above all be emotional and act upon the heart.

Recurring motifs are dreams, memory, childhood, running water accompanied by fire, rain indoors, reflections, levitation, and characters re-appearing in the foreground of long panning movements of the camera.

He once said: "Juxtaposing a person with an environment that is boundless, collating him with a countless number of people passing by close to him and far away, relating a person to the whole world, that is the meaning of cinema.

Tarkovsky incorporated levitation scenes into several of his films, most notably Solaris. To him these scenes possess great power and are used for their photogenic value and magical inexplicability.

These are symbols of film, sight and sound, and Tarkovsky's film frequently has themes of self-reflection. Tarkovsky developed a theory of cinema that he called "sculpting in time".

Andrei Tarkovsky — was a Russian film director , screenwriter and film theorist. He directed several student films, co-directed a documentary, and was the author of numerous screenplays, both for his own films and for those of other directors.

He directed two stage plays and one radio production, played minor acting roles in several films, and wrote a book on film theory.

In addition, Tarkovsky kept a diary published posthumously and appeared in, or was the subject of, several dozen documentaries on the history of cinema and the art and craft of filmmaking.

Tarkovsky began his career at the State Institute of Cinematography with several student films. His first feature film was 's Ivan's Childhood , considered by some to be his most conventional film.

This was followed by four other films during the period to During his time in the Soviet Union he wrote several screenplays for films he ultimately did not realize.

He also contributed towards the productions of several films by other directors, as screenwriter, actor, film editor and artistic advisor.

Tarkovsky left the Soviet Union in and directed the film Nostalghia and the documentary Voyage in Time about the making of Nostalghia in Italy.

His last film The Sacrifice was produced in Sweden, shortly before his death. For a comprehensive list of documentaries on Tarkovsky and documentaries featuring Tarkovsky see Significant Documentaries at Nostalghia.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Chicago Reader. Archived from the original on 22 September Retrieved Andrei Tarkovsky.

Tarkovsky -

Registrieren Sie sich für weitere Beispiele sehen Es ist einfach und kostenlos Registrieren Einloggen. The text is based on poems of Aragon, Apollinaire und Arseni Tarkovsky. He is a virtuoso, Beethoven Und Der Piratenschatz he wants us to be aware of the fact. Film for him was Krimi Bretagne just a reflection of reality; it was more like a poem or a dream. His last film The Sacrifice was produced in Sweden in Time Within Time: The Diaries Andrei Alexander RadszunHotels Ballermann 3 a Russian film directorscreenwriter and film theorist. This was followed by four other films during the period to Archived from the original Tarkovsky 1 December The Steamroller and the Violin.

Solaris, the brilliant interpretation by Tarkovsky, no doubt, overshadowed the story by Stanislaw Lem, and full of profound ideas and beautifully filmed.

Stanislaw Lem, who wrote Solaris, disliked the film and called it a "Crime and a Punishment". However, these critiques can be considered a compliment and we can nowadays call Tarkovsky as the Dostoyevsky of cinematography.

His films are deeply spiritual. In the entire history of cinema there has never been a director, who has made such a dramatic stand for the human spirit as did Andrei Tarkovsky.

Today, when cinema seems to be reduced to a banality the films by Tarkovsky are nearly forgotten. The new generation raised on popcorn does not know this great master.

He was a one of a kind genius and he created his own language, his own world. He wrote:"It is so much easier to slip down than it is to rise one iota above your own narrow, opportunist motives.

A true spiritual birth is extraordinarily hard to achieve. And there are other unique qualities, which make Tarkovsky a great director and also a great human being.

He had a strong belief that conscience is "the most important thing" and wanted to make other filmmakers aware of "the fact that the most convincing of the arts demands a special responsibility on the part of those who work in it: the methods by which cinema affects audiences can be used far more easily and rapidly for their moral decomposition, for the destruction of their spiritual defenses, than the means of the old, more traditional art forms.

Modern art has taken a wrong turn in abandoning the search for the meaning of existence in order to affirm the value of the individual for his own sake.

What purports to be art begins to looks like an eccentric occupation for suspect characters who maintain that any personalized action is of intrinsic value simply as a display of self-will.

But in an artistic creation the personality does not assert itself, it serves another, higher, and communal idea. The artist is always the servant, and is perpetually trying to pay for the gift that has been given to him as if by a miracle.

Modern man, however, does not want to make any sacrifice, even though true affirmation of the self can only be expressed in sacrifice. We are gradually forgetting about this, and at the same time, inevitably, losing all sense of human calling.

Tarkovsky was a deep thinker who rejected the commercialized society and the coca cola culture. It is interesting to read his notes about America.

But when I saw those places with my own eyes I concluded it was just the opposite. Entire America is a kind of Disneyland decorations.

Houses are made from slats, planed boards, and plywood. A feeling of the lack of stability and solidity hangs above it all. Krzysztof Zanussi, with whom we were travelling, was explaining this by the American dynamism, unwillingness to grow into any one place, readiness to run across the country whenever a better job beckons.

Hamlet — or a portion of it at least — should be filmed in Monument Valley. It's astonishing that in places like this, where one ought to talk to God, Americans make westerns like John Ford used to do.

A village. Girls in long skirts. Vast spaces, roads on which it's impossible to get run over by a passing car. Tiny towns and a wonderful prairie.

Poor Americans — with no soul, no roots, living in a land of spiritual riches, a land they don't know and don't appreciate. He divorced his wife, Irma Raush , in June Their son, Andrei Andreyevich Tarkovsky, was born in the same year on 7 August.

He had worked on this together with screenwriter Fridrikh Gorenshtein as early as From to , he shot the film Mirror , a highly autobiographical and unconventionally structured film drawing on his childhood and incorporating some of his father's poems.

In this film Tarkovsky portrayed the plight of childhood affected by war. Tarkovsky had worked on the screenplay for this film since , under the consecutive titles Confession , White day and A white, white day.

From the beginning the film was not well received by Soviet authorities due to its content and its perceived elitist nature. Soviet authorities placed the film in the "third category," a severely limited distribution, and only allowed it to be shown in third-class cinemas and workers' clubs.

Few prints were made and the film-makers received no returns. Third category films also placed the film-makers in danger of being accused of wasting public funds, which could have serious effects on their future productivity.

During , Tarkovsky also worked on the screenplay Hoffmanniana , about the German writer and poet E. The main role was played by Anatoly Solonitsyn , who also acted in several of Tarkovsky's films.

At the end of , he also wrote the screenplay Sardor together with the writer Aleksandr Misharin. Tarkovsky had met the brothers first in and was in contact with them until his death in Initially he wanted to shoot a film based on their novel Dead Mountaineer's Hotel and he developed a raw script.

Influenced by a discussion with Arkady Strugatsky he changed his plan and began to work on the script based on Roadside Picnic.

Work on this film began in The production was mired in troubles; improper development of the negatives had ruined all the exterior shots.

Tarkovsky's relationship with cinematographer Georgy Rerberg deteriorated to the point where he hired Alexander Knyazhinsky as a new first cinematographer.

Furthermore, Tarkovsky suffered a heart attack in April , resulting in further delay. To get the project approved by Goskino , Tarkovsky submitted a script that was different from the original script, omitting several scenes that were critical of the official atheism in the Soviet Union.

After shooting roughly half of the film the project was stopped by Goskino after it became apparent that the film differed from the script submitted to the censors.

Tarkovsky was reportedly infuriated by this interruption and destroyed most of the film. During the summer of , Tarkovsky traveled to Italy, where he shot the documentary Voyage in Time together with his long-time friend Tonino Guerra.

Tarkovsky returned to Italy in for an extended trip, during which he and Guerra completed the script for the film Nostalghia. During this period, he took Polaroid photographs depicting his personal life.

Tarkovsky returned to Italy in to start shooting Nostalghia. He did not return to his home country. As Mosfilm withdrew from the project, he had to complete the film with financial support provided by the Italian RAI.

Tarkovsky completed the film in Soviet authorities prevented the film from winning the Palme d'Or , [21] a fact that hardened Tarkovsky's resolve to never work in the Soviet Union again.

He spent most of preparing the film The Sacrifice. At a press conference in Milan on 10 July , he announced that he would never return to the Soviet Union and would remain in Europe.

At that time, his son Andrei Jr. The Sacrifice was Tarkovsky's last film, dedicated to his son, Andrei Jr. Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky , which documents the making of The Sacrifice , was released after the filmmaker's death in During , he shot the film The Sacrifice in Sweden.

At the end of the year he was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. In January , he began treatment in Paris and was joined there by his son, who was finally allowed to leave the Soviet Union.

As Tarkovsky was unable to attend due to his illness, the prizes were collected by his son, Andrei Jr. In Tarkovsky's last diary entry 15 December , he wrote: "But now I have no strength left — that is the problem".

The diaries are sometimes also known as Martyrolog and were published posthumously in and in English in Tarkovsky died in Paris on 29 December His funeral ceremony was held at the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral.

The inscription on his gravestone, which was conceived by Tarkovsky's wife, Larisa Tarkovskaya, reads: To the man who saw the Angel.

A conspiracy theory emerged in Russia in the early s when it was alleged that Tarkovsky did not die of natural causes but was assassinated by the KGB.

Evidence for this hypothesis includes testimonies by former KGB agents who claim that Viktor Chebrikov gave the order to eradicate Tarkovsky to curtail what the Soviet government and the KGB saw as anti-Soviet propaganda by Tarkovsky.

Other evidence includes several memoranda that surfaced after the coup and the claim by one of Tarkovsky's doctors that his cancer could not have developed from a natural cause.

As with Tarkovsky, his wife Larisa Tarkovskaya and actor Anatoly Solonitsyn all died from the very same type of lung cancer. Vladimir Sharun, sound designer in Stalker , is convinced that they were all poisoned by the chemical plant where they were shooting the film.

Numerous awards were bestowed on Tarkovsky throughout his lifetime. He was also nominated for the Palme d'Or two times. Under the influence of Glasnost and Perestroika , Tarkovsky was finally recognized in the Soviet Union in the Autumn of , shortly before his death, by a retrospective of his films in Moscow.

After his death, an entire issue of the film magazine Iskusstvo Kino was devoted to Tarkovsky. In their obituaries, the film committee of the Council of Ministers of the USSR and the Union of Soviet Film Makers expressed their sorrow that Tarkovsky had to spend the last years of his life in exile.

Posthumously, he was awarded the Lenin Prize in , one of the highest state honors in the Soviet Union. In three consecutive events, the Moscow International Film Festival awards the annual Andrei Tarkovsky Award in the years of , and In the Andrei Tarkovsky Museum opened in Yuryevets , his childhood town.

Tarkovsky has been the subject of several documentaries. Sokurov's own work has been heavily influenced by Tarkovsky. The film consists mostly of narration over stock footage from Tarkovsky's films.

Ingmar Bergman was quoted as saying: "Tarkovsky for me is the greatest [of us all], the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream".

The screenplay is based on Tarkovsky's year in the taiga as a member of a research expedition, prior to his enrollment in film school.

The expedition is surrounded by mystery, and its purpose is a state secret. Although some authors claim that the screenplay was filmed, according to Marina Tarkovskaya, Tarkovsky's sister and wife of Aleksandr Gordon, a fellow student of Tarvosky during his film school years the screenplay was never filmed.

The screenplay is based on the life and work of German author E. In an acquaintance from Tallinnfilm approached Tarkovsky to write a screenplay on a German theme.

Tarkovsky considered Thomas Mann and E. Hoffmann, and also thought about Ibsen 's Peer Gynt. In the end Tarkovsky signed a contract for a script based on the life and work of Hoffmann.

Tarkovsky planned to write the script during the summer of at his dacha. Writing was not without difficulty, less than a month before the deadline he had not written a single page.

He finally finished the project in late and submitted the final script to Tallinnfilm in October. Although the script was well received by the officials at Tallinnfilm, it was the consensus that no one but Tarkovsky would be able to direct it.

The script was sent to Goskino in February , and although approval was granted for proceeding with making the film the screenplay was never realized.

In , during the time of his exile in the West, Tarkovsky revisited the screenplay and made a few changes. He also considered to finally direct a film based on the screenplay but ultimately dropped this idea.

Tarkovsky became a film director during the mid and late s, a period referred to as the Khrushchev Thaw , during which Soviet society opened to foreign films, literature and music, among other things.

This allowed Tarkovsky to see films of European, American and Japanese directors, an experience that influenced his own film making.

His teacher and mentor at the film school, Mikhail Romm , allowed his students considerable freedom and emphasized the independence of the film director.

Tarkovsky was, according to fellow student Shavkat Abdusalmov, fascinated by Japanese films. He was amazed by how every character on the screen is exceptional and how everyday events such as a Samurai cutting bread with his sword are elevated to something special and put into the limelight.

Tarkovsky was also a deeply religious Orthodox Christian, who believed great art should have a higher spiritual purpose, Tarkovsky was a perfectionist not given to humor or humility.

His signature style was ponderous and literary, having many characters that pondered over religious themes and issues regarding faith.

Tarkovsky perceived that the art of cinema has only been truly mastered by very few filmmakers, stating in a interview with Naum Abramov that "they can be counted on the fingers of one hand".

With the exception of City Lights , the list does not contain any films of the early silent era. The reason is that Tarkovsky saw film as an art as only a relatively recent phenomenon, with the early film-making forming only a prelude.

The list has also no films or directors from Tarkovsky's native Russia, although he rated Soviet directors such as Boris Barnet , Sergei Parajanov and Alexander Dovzhenko highly.

He said of Dovzhenko's Earth : "I have lived a lot among very simple farmers and met extraordinary people. They spread calmness, had such tact, they conveyed a feeling of dignity and displayed wisdom that I have seldom come across on such a scale.

Dovzhenko had obviously understood wherein the sense of life resides. Dovzhenko understood this. Andrei Tarkovsky was not a fan of science fiction, largely dismissing it for its "comic book" trappings and vulgar commercialism.

He was critical of the "brutality and low acting skills", but was nevertheless impressed by the film. In a interview, Tarkovsky argued: "All art, of course, is intellectual, but for me, all the arts, and cinema even more so, must above all be emotional and act upon the heart.

Recurring motifs are dreams, memory, childhood, running water accompanied by fire, rain indoors, reflections, levitation, and characters re-appearing in the foreground of long panning movements of the camera.

He once said: "Juxtaposing a person with an environment that is boundless, collating him with a countless number of people passing by close to him and far away, relating a person to the whole world, that is the meaning of cinema.

Tarkovsky incorporated levitation scenes into several of his films, most notably Solaris. To him these scenes possess great power and are used for their photogenic value and magical inexplicability.

These are symbols of film, sight and sound, and Tarkovsky's film frequently has themes of self-reflection. Tarkovsky developed a theory of cinema that he called "sculpting in time".

By this he meant that the unique characteristic of cinema as a medium was to take our experience of time and alter it.

Unedited movie footage transcribes time in real time. By using long takes and few cuts in his films, he aimed to give the viewers a sense of time passing, time lost, and the relationship of one moment in time to another.

Up to, and including, his film Mirror , Tarkovsky focused his cinematic works on exploring this theory. After Mirror , he announced that he would focus his work on exploring the dramatic unities proposed by Aristotle : a concentrated action, happening in one place, within the span of a single day.

Several of Tarkovsky's films have color or black-and-white sequences. This first occurs in the otherwise monochrome Andrei Rublev , which features a color epilogue of Rublev's authentic religious icon paintings.

All of his films afterwards contain monochrome, and in Stalker's case sepia sequences, while otherwise being in color.

In , in an interview conducted shortly after finishing Andrei Rublev , Tarkovsky dismissed color film as a "commercial gimmick" and cast doubt on the idea that contemporary films meaningfully use color.

He claimed that in everyday life one does not consciously notice colors most of the time, and that color should therefore be used in film mainly to emphasize certain moments, but not all the time, as this distracts the viewer.

To him, films in color were like moving paintings or photographs, which are too beautiful to be a realistic depiction of life.

Ingmar Bergman , a renowned director, commented on Tarkovsky: [51]. My discovery of Tarkovsky's first film was like a miracle. Suddenly, I found myself standing at the door of a room the keys of which had until then, never been given to me.

It was a room I had always wanted to enter and where he was moving freely and fully at ease. I felt encountered and stimulated: someone was expressing what I had always wanted to say without knowing how.

Tarkovsky is for me the greatest, the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream.

Contrarily, however, Bergman conceded the truth in the claim made by a critic who wrote that "with Autumn Sonata Bergman does Bergman", adding: "Tarkovsky began to make Tarkovsky films, and that Fellini began to make Fellini films [ Tarkovsky worked in close collaboration with cinematographer Vadim Yusov from to , and much of the visual style of Tarkovsky's films can be attributed to this collaboration.

In his last film, The Sacrifice , Tarkovsky worked with cinematographer Sven Nykvist , who had worked on many films with director Ingmar Bergman.

Nykvist was not alone: several people involved in the production had previously collaborated with Bergman, notably lead actor Erland Josephson , who had also acted for Tarkovsky in Nostalghia.

Nykvist complained that Tarkovsky would frequently look through the camera and even direct actors through it, but ultimately stated that choosing to work with Tarkovsky was one of the best choices he had ever made.

Tarkovsky is mainly known as a film director. During his career he directed seven feature films, as well as three shorts from his time at VGIK.

His features are:. He also wrote several screenplays. Furthermore, he directed the play Hamlet for the stage in Moscow, directed the opera Boris Godunov in London, and he directed a radio production of the short story Turnabout by William Faulkner.

He also wrote Sculpting in Time , a book on film theory. The documentary Voyage in Time was produced in Italy in , as was Nostalghia in His last film The Sacrifice was produced in Sweden in Tarkovsky was personally involved in writing the screenplays for all his films, sometimes with a cowriter.

Tarkovsky once said that a director who realizes somebody else's screenplay without being involved in it becomes a mere illustrator, resulting in dead and monotonous films.

A book of 60 photos, Instant Light, Tarkovsky Polaroids , taken by Tarkovsky in Russia and Italy between and was published in From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For the surname, as well as other people with this name, see Tarkovsky surname. Russian filmmaker. Paris , France. Main article: List of awards won by Andrei Tarkovsky.

Main article: Andrei Tarkovsky filmography. Retrieved 11 August

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Praying Through Cinema – Understanding Andrei Tarkovsky

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